Hélène Bellenger. Extrait du projet Bianco ordinario, 2021-2023.
Hélène Bellenger. Extrait du projet Bianco ordinario, 2021-2023.
Hélène Bellenger. Extrait du projet Bianco ordinario, 2021-2023.
Hélène Bellenger. Extrait du projet Bianco ordinario, 2021-2023.
Rebekka Deubner. Extrait du projet Strip, 2022-2023.
Rebekka Deubner. Extrait du projet Strip, 2022-2023.
Rebekka Deubner. Extrait du projet Strip, 2022-2023.
Rebekka Deubner. Extrait du projet Strip, 2022-2023.
Léonie Pondevie. Extrait du projet Un point bleu pâle, 2023.
Léonie Pondevie. Extrait du projet Un point bleu pâle, 2023.
Léonie Pondevie. Extrait du projet Un point bleu pâle, 2023.
Léonie Pondevie. Extrait du projet Un point bleu pâle, 2023.
Rebecca Topakian. Extrait du projet Il faut que les braises de Constantinople s’envolent jusqu’en Europe, 2021 - en cours.
Rebecca Topakian. Extrait du projet Il faut que les braises de Constantinople s’envolent jusqu’en Europe, 2021 - en cours.
Rebecca Topakian. Extrait du projet Il faut que les braises de Constantinople s’envolent jusqu’en Europe, 2021 - en cours.
Rebecca Topakian. Extrait du projet Il faut que les braises de Constantinople s’envolent jusqu’en Europe, 2021 - en cours.
Arno Brignon. Extrait du projet Us, 2018-2022.
Arno Brignon. Extrait du projet Us, 2018-2022.
Arno Brignon. Extrait du projet Us, 2018-2022.
Arno Brignon. Extrait du projet Us, 2018-2022.
Nina Medioni. Extrait du projet Le Voile, 2019-2022.
Nina Medioni. Extrait du projet Le Voile, 2019-2022.
Nina Medioni. Extrait du projet Le Voile, 2019-2022.
Nina Medioni. Extrait du projet Le Voile, 2019-2022.
Marc-Antoine Garnier. Colonnes, 2021.
Marc-Antoine Garnier. Nuage, 2019.
Marc-Antoine Garnier. Temps solaire, 2018.
Marc-Antoine Garnier. L'image et son double, 2022.
Damien Caccia. Extrait de Larmes, 2015-2022.
Damien Caccia. Extrait de Larmes, 2015-2022.
Damien Caccia. Extrait de Larmes, 2015-2022.
Damien Caccia. Extrait de Larmes, 2015-2022.
Coline Jourdan. Extrait du projet Soulever la poussière
Coline Jourdan. Extrait du projet Soulever la poussière
Coline Jourdan. Extrait du projet Soulever la poussière
Coline Jourdan. Extrait du projet Les noirceurs du fleuve rouge
Pauline Hisbacq. Extrait du projet Songs for women and birds
Pauline Hisbacq. Extrait du projet Songs for women and birds
Pauline Hisbacq. Extrait du projet Songs for women and birds
Pauline Hisbacq. Extrait du projet Songs for women and birds
Nolwenn Brod, Hands, Warsaw 2021. Extrait du projet Time of immaturity
Nolwenn Brod, Hands, Warsaw 2021. Extrait du projet Time of immaturity
Nolwenn Brod, Hands, Warsaw 2021. Extrait du projet Time of immaturity
Nolwenn Brod, Hands, Warsaw 2021. Extrait du projet Time of immaturity
Anaïs Boileau. Extrait du projet Au bois du bac
Anaïs Boileau. Extrait du projet Au bois du bac
Anaïs Boileau. Extrait du projet Au bois du bac
Anaïs Boileau. Extrait du projet Au bois du bac

FRUTESCENS

FUTURES is a photography platform dedicated to the emerging European photography community. It pools resources and programs dedicated to young photography from cultural institutions throughout Europe in order to support new talent. After 4 years of existence, it renews its project: the Centre photographique Rouen Normandie becomes the French representative within it.

Each year, the members of FUTURES designate a group of artists to join the platform. Each photographer selected by the members has access to a network of professionals and audiences, as well as a multitude of resources and curatorial expertise. Futures organizes a series of events across Europe in each of its member countries, online activities for professional and artistic development, workshops, portfolio readings, exhibitions…

As part of this partnership, the Rouen Normandy Photographic Center is creating FRUTESCENS, a program dedicated to young French photographic creation. Four artists (who have entered photography in the last ten years) are selected and then brought together for a week of workshops and meetings in Normandy. These artists join the FUTURES platform and as such benefit from the European network offered by the platform and its members.

Discover the 4 artists selected in 2023 below:

As part of its participation in the FUTURES platform, the Centre photographique has developed the Frutescens program, dedicated to the French photographic scene. For this 2023 edition, we have chosen to surround ourselves with personalities from the photographic world, chosen for their complementary views and perspectives on photographic creation. With Nathalie Giraudeau (Centre photographique d’Ile-de-France, Pontault-Combault), Emilia Genuardi (a ppr oc he, Paris), Marie Magnier (Les Filles du Calvaire, Paris), Jordan Alves (Éditions Xavier Barral, Paris), Julia Gelezova and Angel Luis Gonzalez (PhotoIreland, Dublin), Françoise Paviot (galerie Françoise Paviot, Paris) and Baptiste Rabichon (photographer, Paris), we have selected four photographers who are active in France: Arno Brignon, Damien Caccia, Marc-Antoine Garnier and Nina Medioni.

Looking for the common thread between authors with diverse backgrounds and views, we often get lost in simplifying the singularities and asperities of each of the works presented tend to be polished by dint of generalities. Let us risk the exercise with the four artists selected here and let us simply observe: they share, with us, a world held in uncertain balance of which the precarious condition is reminded us at each moment. It is on this slight thread that these artists move forward and build individually a work woven of troubles. Thus each in his own way, impregnated with this context of shared fragility, reconsiders the technical and relational processes at work in photography. In Arno Brignon’s work, uncertainty is lodged at the heart of the raw material by recycling outdated silver film; in Damien Caccia’s work, the permanence of the medium is thwarted by the systematic alteration of the recorded image; in Marc-Antoine Garnier’s work, the photographic dimension is perpetually put at risk, and in Nina Medioni’s work, the relationship between the photographed and the photographer is constantly reassessed.

Discover the 4 artists selected in 2023 below:

ARNO BRIGNON

From his experience as an educator on the edges of Toulouse, Arno Brignon (1976), keeps an appeal for works built in a collaborative way, often within the framework of workshop and residency projects rooted in urban or rural contexts.Invited to Aussillon (South of France), he works in a housing area undergoing rehabilitation and occupies an apartment in one of the deserted buildings to live, photograph and arrange meals; the practice of portraiture becomes one of the ways in which he recreates, with the inhabitants, the memory of the place. In Valparaiso, he employs the calotype process to express the alteration of memory and the disappearance of the social bond. Gradually, the photographer moves towards an assumed onirism, embracing the random, seeking the accident. Recently, he went on a photographic trip to the United States with his family in the form of a road movie (Us, 2018-2022) in which photography serves as a link, both with strangers he met along the way and with members of his family. His use of outdated analogue films, products of a past industry, entrusts his photographic act to the erosion of the film, leaving room for the work of time.

 

DAMIEN CACCIA

Damien Caccia’s (1989) photography fits into a pictorial practice. His painting, initially figurative at the end of his studies, becomes more and more abstract. The figuration of the matter becomes little by little its theme, and the painter scrapes so much and more until preserving only the trace of the gesture which affixed the color. The canvas becomes the place of a former action of which is preserved only a mark more and more evanescent, altered. It is for its quality of residual imprint that the painter seizes photography. At one time he undertook to record with a portable scanner the entirety of a garden in order to restore it in the form of a large roll of paper, via fax. Later still, it is the screen of the telephone whose memory he comes to probe, seeking beyond the screen saver to find the ghostly image that this one comes to dissimulate. With Tears (2015-2022), he creates an attention-grabbing set: tiny details, insignificant moments held, somehow, on small surfaces (fine drops of glue) similar to damaged lenses.

 

MARC-ANTOINE GARNIER

Folding, assembling, piercing, braiding paper: the work of Marc-Antoine Garnier (1989) thwarts the two dimensions of the photographic cliché. Is it photography? The act of taking a picture is only a preliminary, the existence of the future image is played out in other gestures, subsequent, which come to build a space of paper surfaces. Large rolls of sunsets arranged in a blank room recreate a colored harmony, a dappled blue sky sees the course of its clouds replayed by the cutting of the framed image into several wavy strips. At the beginning, there is thus Marc-Antoine Garnier who photographs not so much “on the motif” as the pattern itself, sensing the gestures, often multiple, that will accompany it to put it back into space. His pattern is always natural; his basic material is the infinity of the great elements. Recently, he plunged into the vegetal infinity, the lens in a jungle of branches or a forest of petals, to go and look for, on the surface of their image, the perceived form still contained in the thickness of the paper: the long and fine foliage are braided and find their indocility and the speckles of bunches of flowers, by scraping, to resurface.

 

NINA MEDIONI

At the heart of Nina Medioni’s (1991) photographic form lies the encounter and the long time. The photographer invests places sometimes linked to her personal history, sometimes unknown. In her survey, the camera becomes a tool: a box to record the territory through which she passes. She often chooses the summer time, dilated, without any apparent event, indolent. The event then, the one by which the image will come about, is the encounter. To bring it about, there is the presence, unusual in these environments, of the camera and the spoken word. It is not surprising then that we often find in her photographic projects, series of images, portraits and gestures taken in the same time-space. None of the portraits in the same shot take priority over the other, she explains. She places them on the page, careful not to cut their speech; it is then up to us to read the transcript of the words exchanged with this young boy from Prépaou, a small residential town in the South of France. Recently, she realized in Israel, The Veil (2019-2022), a photographic project of greater scale. There she surveys a distant, unfamiliar family territory and seeks through photography and portraiture to weave a heretofore non-existent link. The camera is then a limit-space, where to try to meet the members of a part of her family that she does not know, belonging to an orthodox Jewish community. The photographic image will record here the attempt of confrontation, the elusive success or the failure. The photographic surface then embodies the threshold on which the photographer and the photographed stand. Recently, she directed Le Chalet (2022), a short film about a mysterious house in the 19th arrondissement of Paris, inhabited by her uncle. The meetings with the residents, young and old, of the neighborhood, the brief or recurring dialogues make emerge the contours of a “chalet” planted on the boulevard, which she will always make sure to leave in the background. In Nina Medioni’s work, the photographer’s taking of the image and the person being photographed’s taking of the words are definitely linked.

 

Discover below the 4 artists selected in 2022:

ANAÏS BOILEAU

Anaïs Boileau’s first works freely associated Mediterranean architectures with frank geometries and portraits of women receiving the sun. Between the two, a strange resonance could be heard, that created by the reverberation of the sun on the photographed surfaces: skin, facades, glasses and other tanning accessories… The flatness of the abandoned bodies echoed that of the colored walls. The photograph, although well and truly figurative, was filled with the silence of forms, the play of their surfaces, their colors. This Plein Soleil, which made her known, is in retrospect a preamble to the experiments recently carried out by the photographer. Still in the South of France, she now composes in her garden. The means are simple: a few sheets of paper, gathered for the palette of specific textures and colors they deploy, here and there accessories and garden materials and then, the effect of the sun on their surfaces. The artist and the sun compose together and enjoy the play of shadows, and in places, the paint and its transparency make their appearance and add to the confusion of the image.

From the reality of the garden, of the farmyard, however present, this small open-air studio manages to gradually abstract itself to take us with it, in a plastic ecstasy, similar to the dizziness that the sun provides.

Anaïs Boileau was born in 1992 in Nîmes. She is a photographic artist who works by exploring Mediterranean cultures as a constant source of inspiration in her projects. She graduated from the art school of Lausanne, ECAL. She lives in the south of France where she alternates between photographic commissions and her artistic projects. Her work is presented in various group exhibitions and selected in several international festivals. In September 2017, she joins a master year at Central Saint Martins School in London in photography. Since her first collaboration for M le magazine du Monde in 2015, she works regularly for the French and international press. Her work can be found in magazines and newspapers such as Le Monde, M le magazine du Monde, The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Time or Vanity Fair.

COLINE JOURDAN

On the banks of the Rio Tinto in Spain or on the outskirts of the old arsenic mine in Salsigne, Coline Jourdan undertakes an archaeology of toxicity. If toxicity is generally not perceived, what could photography do at the place of its figuration? How could she claim to represent it? To make an image of it, Coline Jourdan combines documentary investigation and plastic experimentation. She gathers documents and testimonies, recently, on the occasion of Raising the Dust, a series dedicated to the former gold and arsenic mine of Salsigne, she enlists the collaboration of scientists, from whom she records research processes and testimonies, consults the archives of the department, digs into the iconographies of the past glory of the site. In the image of these collections of information, her photography becomes a collection of traces. One discovers here a collection of small stones, there some plant specimens, and suddenly, on what one recognizes as a slag heap, the emergence of points of incandescence on the surface of the image. Her photography sometimes literally becomes a means of taking samples of the terrain explored: for example, she occasionally dips her films in the water of the nearby river. What the territory contains is then symbolically revealed in the thickness of the photographic material, until it exudes.

Coline Jourdan, born in 1993, lives and works in Rouen, Normandy. She graduated from the École nationale supérieure d’art de Dijon in 2017. Her work has been presented in group and solo exhibitions (Musée Nicéphore Niepce as part of the Ateliers Vortex Photographic Print Prize in 2019; Festival de La Gacilly, Baden, Austria, 2021; Artefacts, (Residency 1+2), Chapelle des Cordeliers, Toulouse, 2020; Les noirceurs du fleuve rouge, Galerie Full B1, Rouen, 2019). In 2021, she received the Support for Contemporary Documentary Photography from the CNAP, as well as individual support for creation from the Normandy Region. The same year, she is the laureate of the 50CC Air de Normandie artist grant.

NOLWENN BROD

It is a phenomenological photography that Nolwenn Brod constructs, one that places at the heart of the creative process, the experience of the encounter. It all began in Ireland in the footsteps of her father (Va-t’en me perdre où tu voudras, 2015 – Poursuite Editions) and then in cities with an industrial or port history, affected by the war: Lodz, Warsaw, Gdansk in Poland, Beirut in Lebanon and more recently Brest in Brittany. It is often a question of the representation of an inner struggle, of a duel, of the forms created by the forces in conflict.  Each portrait, each individual case, is political; the bodies make society. The meticulous observation of the significant gestures of daily life, the micro-sensation, the micro-event, the volatility of the moment, of the presence of beings, nourish her work. 

With, on, under, through, would be as many conjunctions to apprehend the environment and the inhabitants in and with which she is brought to work. The projects are nourished by literary companionship: the structuralism of Witold Gombrowicz’s street accompanies her in Poland during the realization of Time of immaturity (2018 – in progress); in Creuse, on the lines of Gilles Deleuze, she composes the photographs of La Ritournelle (2015-16); more recently, Jean-Luc Nancy, Charles S. Peirce or Tanguy Viel inspire Les Hautes solitudes in Brest (2021 – in progress).

Nolwenn Brod is a French artist based in Paris. She studied humanities and social sciences, and trained in photography in London and at the Gobelins school in Paris. She is a member of Agence Vu and represented by the eponymous gallery in Paris since 2016.

She develops her projects most often in the context of creative residencies in France and Europe where she mixes photography and video; and responds to commissions for the press and institutions. Her works are regularly exhibited in France and Europe and are part of the collections of the Bnf, the Cnap, the Musée Nicéphore Niépce, the Musée de Bretagne, the Villa Noailles, the Agnès b. collection, the Neuflize OBC Foundation, art libraries and private collections. Her first book was published by Poursuite in 2015, the second is in preparation.

PAULINE HISBACQ

Pauline Hisbacq’s work, in photography or through the manipulation of archival images (collages, montages), evokes in a poetic way the questions of youth, desire, rites of passage and resistance. She searches for feelings in forms and figures. She explores today what links the intimate and the political, the myth and the contemporary. 

The project Songs for women and birds is a set of collages made from archival images of the Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp (1981-2000). There, ordinary women peacefully fought, solo, against the installation of nuclear missiles by the United States, right here in England, which contributed to the terror of the Cold War. They sang in resistance to the police, and more generally to the world of domination, for the preservation of future generations, the hope of peace, the protection of humanity, and respect for nature.

The collages focus on the way women inscribe their bodies in a gesture of resistance that is the antithesis of current demonstrations. The first challenge to communicate their revolt was to be always peaceful, even in the face of police repression. It was thus necessary to weld the bodies, in the tenderness, to make face with the domination which they denounced and which attacked them. Scissor cuts are made on archival images of the protest, to show the specific body language of the women of Greenham. 

 

Pauline Hisbacq was born in 1980 in Toulouse, France and lives and works in Paris. After a master’s degree in philosophy, she entered the ENSP of Arles from which she graduated in 2011. She continued the same year with a post-graduate degree at the ICP in New York. Since then, her work has been presented at the Rencontres de la Jeune photographie Internationale de Niort (2014), at the Ecureuil Foundation for Contemporary Art in Toulouse (2019), at the Image Satellite in Nice (2018), at the friche belle de Mai in Marseille (2017), at the Paris Saint Germain Photo Festival (2017), at the Bal (2019), at the Rouen Normandie Photographic Center (2021).  She published Natalya at 7 Editions (2016), Le feu at September books (2017), Amour adolescente (chants d’amour) at Rayon Vert edition (2019), Cadavre Exquis, fanzine co-edited by Le Bal Books and September Books (2021), Songs for women and birds at September books (2021). In 2017, she was awarded the CNAP’s Soutien à la photographie documentaire contemporaine grant for the project La fête et les cendres. In 2021, she received the Aide Individuelle à la Création from the Drac Ile de France for the project Rimorso. She is also the winner of the national commission Les Regards du Grand Paris initiated by the CNAP and the Ateliers Médicis, with the project Pastorale. She is currently a photographer at the Rodin Museum and editor at Septembre Books. 

Discover more about FUTURES and its members :